Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein was a German born scientist who lived from 1879-1955 (Mastin 2000). He was a prominent physicist who has had many scientific achievements in the twentieth century (Howard 2004).  An interesting fact about him was that he was kicked out of school (Howard 2004). Einstein won the Nobel Prize for his contributions to quantum physics, his equation E = mc2, and his “Theory of Relativity” (Howard 2004). This essay is going to explain how Einstein contributed to physics, biology, and astronomy. He is considered one the most important scientists and philosophers in the world because later scientists used his work to explain life further over time.

 

First, Einstein’s contributions to physics included his theories of relativity which revolutionized how people think of mass, gravity, space, time and energy. The “Theory of Relativity” explains how the laws of physics are the same for all non-accelerating observers. To be more specific, this was the one that was called, “Theory of Special Relativity”. This meant that events that occur at the same time for one observer could occur at different times for another (Redd 2016). Since the theory was developed, it has helped all modern-day scientists come up with new theories or ideas. This isn’t the only thing Einstein contributed to though!

 

Second, Einstein’s discovery of atoms as the basic structure of any living organism has helped the advancement of biology. Not only that it has helped other sciences develop. After completing his PhD, Einstein wrote a paper “explaining Brownian motion (the seemingly random movement of particles suspended in a fluid) as direct evidence of molecular action, thus supporting the atomic theory (that all matter is made up of tiny atoms and molecules)” (Mastin 2009). Because of his discoveries, scientists were able to further develop chemistry and explain the basic components of biology. Einstein has done many important historical things, and this is not the only one.

 

Third, astronomy benefited significantly from Einstein’s work. Our universe uses gravity to keep it in motion. This discovery was aided by his “Theory of Relativity” and his work on gravity and deflection (Snyder 2006). “As a result, he found that space and time were interwoven into a single continuum known as space-time. Events that occur at the same time for one observer could occur at different times for another” (Redd 2016). This means that Einstein’s work explained space and time with relevancy to gravity, and this is how gravity helped explain the way planets, moons, suns and stars move. It also explained why there are different galaxies and constellations within them. Without this information would astronauts be on the moon yet?

 

Einstein has had many accomplishments because of his lifetime of work that have helped humanity. These accomplishments contributed to physics, biology and astronomy. In my opinion, Einstein deserved all of his awards because of how he has changed the perspective of humanity on the universe and how it works. However, I wish all his discoveries could have been taught to young kids like me. What do you think about all this?

 

Sources:

 

 

Engen, Kelsie. “Contributions to Physics.” Einstein’s Contributions to Physics. University of Alaska Fairbanks, Spring 2005. Web. 10 Mar. 2017. <http://ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/212_spring2005.web.dir/Kelsie_Engen/contributions_page3.htm&gt;.

 

Howard, Don A. “Einstein’s Philosophy of Science.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford University, 11 Feb. 2004. Web. 10 Mar. 2017. <https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/einstein-philscience/&gt;.

 

Mastin, Luke. “Albert Einstein – Important Scientists – The Physics of the Universe.” Albert Einstein – Important Scientists – The Physics of the Universe. The Physics of the Universe, 2009. Web. 10 Mar. 2017. <http://www.physicsoftheuniverse.com/scientists_einstein.html&gt;.

 

Redd, Nola Taylor. “Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity.” Space.com. Space.com, 12 July 2016. Web. 15 Mar. 2017. <http://www.space.com/17661-theory-general-relativity.html&gt;.

 

Snyder, Dave. “Gravity, Part 1: What Einstein Did For Astronomy.” Gravity, Part 1: What Einstein Did For Astronomy. University Lowbrow Astromoners, Jan. 2006. Web. 15 Mar. 2017. <https://www.umich.edu/~lowbrows/reflections/2006/dsnyder.16.html&gt;.

 

Stewart, Doug. “Home.” Famous Scientists. Famous Scientists, 2017. Web. 10 Mar. 2017. <https://www.famousscientists.org/albert-einstein/&gt;.

Image from:

Aritonang, Esrom. “15 Funny Jokes About Einstein and Relativity.” LetterPile. LetterPile, 22 Nov. 2016. Web. 17 Mar. 2017. <https://letterpile.com/misc/Top-30-Funny-Einstein-Jokes-15-Einstein-Jokes-about-Relativity-Absent-Minded-Lecturer-and-Confusing-Jokes&gt;.

 

 

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